Developing the Caribbean

Data Journalism - “telling stories with numbers” or otherwise “where a nose for news meets storytelling skill and data sets" has been described as the future of media. Fourteen Caribbean journalists will explore this new and emerging discipline through an innovative Data Journalism fellowship program launched by Panos Caribbean in collaboration with the Caribbean Open Institute (COI) and the International Development Research Centre"

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Are Caribbean Media houses ready for Data Journalism?

Data Journalism has been described as the future of media by no less an authority than Tim Berners-Lee. In a world where social media giants, twitter and facebook have begun to dominate the media landscape, and the internet has democratized and globalized the access to, and accessibility of information, local media houses and professionals need to embrace this new paradigm. However are regional media houses and editors ready for this challenge? 

Data Journalism Workshop - Dominican Republic
Fifteen journallists from 7 Caribbean countries, Antigua & Barbuda, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Kitts, St-Vincent & The Grenadines, Trinidad & Tobago, participated in a two-day Data Journalism workshop held at the Hotel Coral Costa Caribe.located in Juan Dolio, Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic.
 
PANOS- IDRC Data Journalism Fellowship

Data journalism — described as “telling stories with numbers” or otherwise “where a nose for news meets storytelling skill and data sets” — offers journalists a new avenue through which to pursue investigative work while making available to them visualisation tools designed to arrest the attention of their respective publics, certainly in print and online. 15 Caribbean journalists are being provided with the opportunity to explore this new and emerging discipline through an innovative Data Journanalism fellowship program launched by Panos Caribbean in collaboration with the  Caribbean Open Institute (COI), supported by funding from the International Development Research Centre.